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Scotch

Aberfeldy 12-Year-Old Single Malt Scotch

$47.00

OVERALL
RATING

9

Whisky Review: Aberfeldy 12-Year-Old Single Malt Scotch

Tasting Notes:

About:
40% ABV, Aged 12 years in oak, $47. Aberfeldy, Scotland.
Appearance:
A light honey color
Nose:
Dried apricot and red apple come forward first. The fruity notes are followed by leather and oak. Gently charred raw sugar hits next with a nutty quality that finishes out the nose with the sharp spice of clove.
Palate:
and my desire to give it a go once more. That is when I was introduced to the world of single malts. Scotch has defined my preferences in whisky ever since. Both my appreciation for the craft, and the flavors that define a well-aged, balanced spirit that can be sipped, shared, and enjoyed in any setting. As the main flavoring ingredient to its parent company’s eponymous blend, Dewar’s, it is obvious from the first taste of this 12-year-old Aberfeldy why this easy sipper would be a choice in crafting a blended whisky. It is bold but balanced and has a strong enough flavor profile to stand on its own, as well as smooth out the edges of the base alcohol utilized in Dewar’s blends. The Aberfeldy distillery has welcomed visitors since 1898 and aside from a few hiccups and closures over the last 123 years, has been distilling their “liquid gold” ever since. The whimsical connection comes both from its light color and from the waters and land that it is distilled from, known to be rich in the valuable mineral. The competition in the Scotch world is thick. There are large distillers like Macallan and boutique operations such as BenRomach. What sets this Highland single malt apart from the others? Does it keep to the traditional flavor profile of the Highland region? Aberfeldy 12-Year-Old (image via John Dover) Tasting Notes: Aberfeldy 12-Year-Old Vital Stats: 40% ABV, Aged 12 years in oak, $47. Aberfeldy, Scotland. Appearance: A light honey color Nose: Dried apricot and red apple come forward first. The fruity notes are followed by leather and oak. Gently charred raw sugar hits next with a nutty quality that finishes out the nose with the sharp spice of clove. Palate: Nice, quickly dissipating heat that wakes up the palate. It has a buttery flavor laced with apple, dried fruit and a hint of citrus. The fruity flavors are followed by oak and a bit of salinity. Spiciness from baking spices like cinnamon, clove, and nutmeg add to the balanced bite. The finish is smooth adding to the ease of drinking this Highland sipper. with a less smokey nature and more fruit and spice. It does this in a balanced approach and with enough body to stand on its own in a field of tasty contenders. Sending User Review 3.07 (165 votes) Buy Now Share: XFacebookLinkedInEmail Drinks Aizome Island – Tropical Style Minor Cobbler Strawberry Rhubarb Julep Crimson & Clover Club Wynken, Blynken, & Nog Related Articles Whiskey Review: Highline Triple Rye Whiskey Editor’s Note: This whiskey was… READ ARTICLE ? about Whiskey Review: Highline Triple Rye Whiskey American / Reviews Whiskey Review: Savage & Cooke American Whiskey Editor’s Note: This whiskey was… READ ARTICLE ? about Whiskey Review: Savage & Cooke American Whiskey American / Reviews Whisky Review: Bruichladdich Octomore 14.3 Editor’s Note: This whisky was… READ ARTICLE ? about Whisky Review: Bruichladdich Octomore 14.3 Reviews / Scotch Whisky Review: Glenglassaugh 12 Years Old Editor’s Note: This whisky was… READ ARTICLE ? about Whisky Review: Glenglassaugh 12 Years Old Reviews / Scotch Whiskey Review: Highline American Whiskey Editor’s Note: This whiskey was… READ ARTICLE ? about Whiskey Review: Highline American Whiskey American / Reviews Whiskey Review: Savage & Cooke Rye Whiskey Editor’s Note: This whiskey was… READ ARTICLE ? about Whiskey Review: Savage & Cooke Rye Whiskey American / Reviews Whisky Review: Bruichladdich Octomore 14.2 Editor’s Note: This whisky was… READ ARTICLE ? about Whisky Review: Bruichladdich Octomore 14.2 Reviews / Scotch Whisky Review: Glenglassaugh Sandend Editor’s Note: This whisky was… READ ARTICLE ? about Whisky Review: Glenglassaugh Sandend Reviews / Scotch Whiskey Review: Highline Straight Kentucky Whiskey Editor’s Note: This whiskey was… READ ARTICLE ? about Whiskey Review: Highline Straight Kentucky Whiskey American / Reviews Whiskey Review: Savage & Cooke Bourbon Editor’s Note: This whiskey was… READ ARTICLE ? about Whiskey Review: Savage & Cooke Bourbon Bourbon / Reviews John Dover As the creator and writer of “Johnny Scotch”, John Dover has built his Jazz Noir world from the music he is immersed in on a daily basis and from his travels across the US as a professional musician. John continues to build the “Johnny Scotch” library through short stories, and… More by John Dover Follow us on Twitter Find us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram Connect with on on LinkedIn About Advertise Subscribe Editorial Standards Privacy Policy Terms of Use
Finish:
Comments:
Sometimes all you want is a smooth sipper with enough character to bring you back, dram after dram. And for the price, this single malt is a perfect addition to most anyone’s liquor cabinet. Aberfeldy leans heavily into the Highland flavor palate with a less smokey nature and more fruit and spice. It does this in a balanced approach and with enough body to stand on its own in a field of tasty contenders.

Editor’s Note: This whiskey was provided to us as a review sample by Aberfeldy. This in no way, per our editorial policies, influenced the final outcome of this review. It should also be noted that by clicking the buy link towards the bottom of this review our site receives a small referral payment which helps to support, but not influence, our editorial and other costs.

My journey in whisky began as many others’: with a misstep in college that led to over a decade of avoidance of brown liquor as a rule. As I matured, so did my palate and my desire to give it a go once more. That is when I was introduced to the world of single malts. Scotch has defined my preferences in whisky ever since. Both my appreciation for the craft, and the flavors that define a well-aged, balanced spirit that can be sipped, shared, and enjoyed in any setting.

As the main flavoring ingredient to its parent company’s eponymous blend, Dewar’s, it is obvious from the first taste of this 12-year-old Aberfeldy why this easy sipper would be a choice in crafting a blended whisky. It is bold but balanced and has a strong enough flavor profile to stand on its own, as well as smooth out the edges of the base alcohol utilized in Dewar’s blends. The Aberfeldy distillery has welcomed visitors since 1898 and aside from a few hiccups and closures over the last 123 years, has been distilling their “liquid gold” ever since. The whimsical connection comes both from its light color and from the waters and land that it is distilled from, known to be rich in the valuable mineral.

The competition in the Scotch world is thick. There are large distillers like Macallan and boutique operations such as BenRomach. What sets this Highland single malt apart from the others? Does it keep to the traditional flavor profile of the Highland region?

Aberfeldy 12-Year-Old (image via John Dover)
Aberfeldy 12-Year-Old (image via John Dover)

Tasting Notes: Aberfeldy 12-Year-Old

Vital Stats: 40% ABV, Aged 12 years in oak, $47. Aberfeldy, Scotland.

Appearance: A light honey color

Nose: Dried apricot and red apple come forward first. The fruity notes are followed by leather and oak. Gently charred raw sugar hits next with a nutty quality that finishes out the nose with the sharp spice of clove.

Palate: Nice, quickly dissipating heat that wakes up the palate. It has a buttery flavor laced with apple, dried fruit and a hint of citrus. The fruity flavors are followed by oak and a bit of salinity. Spiciness from baking spices like cinnamon, clove, and nutmeg add to the balanced bite. The finish is smooth adding to the ease of drinking this Highland sipper.

John Dover

As the creator and writer of “Johnny Scotch”, John Dover has built his Jazz Noir world from the music he is immersed in on a daily basis and from his travels across the US as a professional musician. John continues to build the “Johnny Scotch” library through short stories, and his comic book collaboration with Illustrator and story board artist Dan Schaefer. John’s musical world and his writing world also collide with the “Johnny Scotch Vignettes”, a series of musical pieces written by Thomas Barber, that incorporate high energy fusion with the spoken word.

John's latest releases include Johnny Scotch #4, illustrated by Dan Schaefer, and the second Johnny Scotch novella, “A Song for Charlie”. John continues to perform and teach as a clinician for Bach trumpets along with his role as the creator and writer of Johnny Scotch.

Outside of the Johnny Scotch world, John has a number of short stories in the horror genre published. You can find his works in "Tales from the Braided Pony", "Monsters 'N' Things", "100 Word Horrors", and "Carnival Tales", and the upcoming "Tenebrous Tales". John has also been a regular contributor to Mythmachine.com as an entertainment writer.

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