Whiskey Review: Jack Daniel’s Triple Mash Blended Straight Whiskey

Editor’s Note: This whiskey was provided to us as a review sample by Jack Daniel’s. This in no way, per our editorial policies, influenced the final outcome of this review. It should also be noted that by clicking the buy link towards the bottom of this review our site receives a small referral payment which helps to support, but not influence, our editorial and other costs.

The second expression in Jack Daniel’s Bonded series is its Triple Mash Blended Straight Whiskey, featuring a blend of Tennessee rye, American malt, and Tennessee whiskey. Master Distiller Chris Fletch has said of the series, “Jack Daniel’s Bonded and Triple Mash are a nod to our heritage with a touch of innovation and craftsmanship. These whiskeys are another opportunity for both our friends and new drinkers to explore and discover everything Jack Daniel’s has to offer.”

Innovation is a word that is seen often in brand statements, with both smaller craft distilleries and larger corporate entities priding themselves on whichever unique blends and creative methods of distilling are popular at the time. At times, those methods do work to develop flavors that stray from the mainstream, and this year’s Bonded series works to make a good argument for the distiller’s recipe. Jack Daniel’s Triple Mash Blended Straight Whiskey follows the rules of an American Bottled-in-Bond; distilled at one distillery, matured for the required aging period, and blended and bottled at 100 proof.

Jack Daniel’s Bonded and Triple Mash is being labeled by the brand as their first “super-premium line extension in 25 years.” While I tend to believe that the company is working overtime to remain as relevant as they have been for over 100 years, I am happy to say that I thoroughly enjoyed both expressions and found them to be both classic and contemporary. I would hold them up to any craft distillery output I’ve tasted recently. And despite the huge output of Jack Daniel’s in 170 countries, the distillery still maintains that their distillation process is “craft,” taking their time to develop flavors instead of mass production and speed taking precedence. Being well-versed in the different bottles from the distillery, I think the Jack Daniel’s Triple Mash could very well be one of a kind.

Jack Daniel’s Triple Mash Blended Straight Whiskey review

Jack Daniel’s Bonded Tennessee Whiskey and Jack Daniel’s Triple Mash Blended Straight Whiskey (image via Brown-Forman)

Tasting Notes: Jack Daniel’s Triple Mash Blended Straight Whiskey

Vital Stats: Blend of three straight Bottled-in-Bond whiskeys – 60% Jack Daniel’s Tennessee rye, 20% Jack Daniel’s Tennessee whiskey, 20% Jack Daniel’s American malt. SRP $32.99/700mL. 100 Proof (50% ABV).

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Appearance: This whiskey is a beautiful brass color, clean as a whistle.

Nose: Light notes of wood varnish and caramel can’t distract from the truly classic Jack Daniel’s aroma.

Palate: With the first taste, I encountered strong notes of honey and apricot, then mid-way through it developed in complexity, and I was reminded of the skin of a tobacco leaf, with the finish smooth and slightly smoky. There’s a pleasant sweetness without any cloy, and the rye has settled nicely over the whole palate.

4.5

Summary

As much as I enjoyed the Bonded expression in the series, this is by far my favorite. There’s a beautiful balance of heat with the complexity of the mash elements that distinguish this whiskey from any others in the Jack Daniel’s catalog. I like the classic bottle and label, which hearkens back to J.D. days of old. The Triple Mash would be a fantastic addition to a cocktail, though even with the higher proof, the whiskey doesn’t burn the palate and would also be well-received neat.

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Jerry Jenae Sampson

Jerry Sampson is a freelance writer, editor and screenwriter. Her creative work is ever improved by her love of whiskey and craft cocktails. She enjoys taking cool fall days to explore the great distilleries around Portland to get a closer look at the inner workings of her favorite spirits.