Chattanooga Whiskey Adds Another Whiskey To Its Well Established Line Up

Chattanooga Whiskey, since its founding in 2011 in Chattanooga, Tennessee, has worked hard to develop a diverse whiskey line up and strong brand. Initially they challenged local ordinances and eventually won the right to distill whiskey in their namesake city for the first time in over 100 years. They are now a major tourist attraction, drawing over 40,000 visitors per year.

As development of their whiskey line up goes, they at first want through a range of experimental batches as they explored what types of expressions to build a permanent portfolio around. Chattanooga Whiskey 91 and Cask 111 were among the first such recipes to go this way, and now they are being joined by Chattanooga Whiskey Tennessee Rye Malt.

Chattanooga Whiskey Tennessee Rye Malt

Chattanooga Whiskey Tennessee Rye Malt (image via Chattanooga Whiskey)

Said by the distillery team to be “following in Chattanooga Whiskey’s unique malt-forward approach to bourbon, Tennessee Rye Malt is the distillery’s malt-forward approach to rye. Crafted using malted rye as the dominant grain (60 percent), the mash bill includes a blend of slow toasted and drum roasted rye malts, which contribute a warm, rich baking spice character to this Rye Malt expression.”

“The richness and sweetness is on par with a bourbon, but the spicy complexity still delivers on the style and expectations of a great rye whiskey,” said Chattanooga Whiskey head distiller Grant McCracken in a prepared statement. “Our version of a straight rye malt whiskey is a rye lover’s rye, but also a bourbon lover’s rye.”

As it stands now plans call for Chattanooga Whiskey Tennessee Rye Malt, bottled at 99 proof and pricing around $40 per 750 ml bottle, to be made available in Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Florida, South Carolina, Texas, Colorado and online at Seelbachs.com. Limited official tasting notes suggest “fruit cake, cola spice, sage and toasted rye with a full bodied, malty sweet finish.”

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