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Pierde Almas Ancestral Corn Whiskey from Oaxaca

OVERALL
RATING

Whiskey Review: Pierde Almas Ancestral Corn Whiskey from Oaxaca

Tasting Notes:

About:
Appearance:
Crystal clear, not very strong legs, may be confused for water.
Nose:
Springtime in a glass. Big notes of floral and honeysuckle. Tropical fruit comes through as kiwi, pineapple and lime.
Palate:
Big mouthfeel with low sugar. It has a bite to it, like tart green apple, no real pepper notes. Papery like wet grain. Conclusion: This is an all-around stand out whiskey, white or otherwise. The nose is a beautiful bouquet and the palate is bold, unique, and continues to be interesting enough to try on its own. I prefer Pierde Almas with some fresh grapefruit juice, but all things considered, I highly recommend you try it. FINAL SCORE: 85/100 Correction: This article has been edited to reflect the correct product name, Pierde Almas Ancestral Corn Whiskey from Oaxaca. The product name previously read Pierde Almas Ancestral Blended Straight Corn Whiskey.
Finish:
Comments:

Editor’s Note: We don’t normally review unaged whiskies here at The Whiskey Wash, but the fact this was made in Mexico, a country definitely not known for whiskey production, grabbed our interest enough to snag a bottle to try out.

We live in a global world, and nowhere is this more evident than in the food and beverage industry. Today, you can find sushi in Nebraska, and Portland-based Blue Star Donuts in Japan. With this global exchange of flavors and products, there is also the adaptation that follows. Bahn Mi was born from a cultural, cooking exchange between the French and the Vietnamese. Today, whiskey is made in Mexico.

Earlier this year, the well-respect Mezcal-brand, Pierde Almas, debuted a white corn whiskey in the United States. Pierde Almas (which translates as “Lost Souls”) is interesting for many reasons, chief among which is the company’s social and cultural responsibility. The brand gives extensively through philanthropy, supporting local sports, education programs, and health clinics.

Even the whiskey itself screams of authenticity (and not of the “trying-too-hard” variety). American artist, Jonathan Barbieri, is the owner of Pierde Almas. He encased the beautiful bottle in craft paper made from native Oaxaca fibers. The corn itself is ancestral grain sourced from around Oaxaca, an integral part of local diet and culture.

Pierde Almas Ancestral Corn Whiskey from Oaxaca retails at roughly $49 and is available in major cities including Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and New York City. It is bottled at 96 proof. Down the line, Barbiere is hoping to set aside 20% of production to release an aged variety.

Pierde Almas
image via Natalie Padilla

Tasting Notes: Pierde Almas Ancestral Corn Whiskey from Oaxaca

Appearance: Crystal clear, not very strong legs, may be confused for water.

Nose: Springtime in a glass. Big notes of floral and honeysuckle. Tropical fruit comes through as kiwi, pineapple and lime.

Palate: Big mouthfeel with low sugar. It has a bite to it, like tart green apple, no real pepper notes. Papery like wet grain.

Conclusion:

This is an all-around stand out whiskey, white or otherwise. The nose is a beautiful bouquet and the palate is bold, unique, and continues to be interesting enough to try on its own. I prefer Pierde Almas with some fresh grapefruit juice, but all things considered, I highly recommend you try it.

FINAL SCORE: 85/100

 

Correction: This article has been edited to reflect the correct product name, Pierde Almas Ancestral Corn Whiskey from Oaxaca. The product name previously read Pierde Almas Ancestral Blended Straight Corn Whiskey. 

Natalie Padilla

Natalie is a food & beverage analyst with Watershed Communications in Portland, Oregon. She has been involved with the f&b world for many years, first as a culinary arts columnist with The Harvard Crimson, at numerous start-ups (wine distributor, as well as artisan cheeseboard maker), and now as an ethnographic research with Watershed. She is interested most in the story behind a product and the culture around it. On the weekend she loves to cook, yoga, trail run, and check out what's new in the art scene.

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